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20090831
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CSPAN2 9
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CSPAN
Aug 31, 2009 8:00am EDT
with members of congress on how they use technology and social media web sites, and many this installment, a conversation with republican representative john culberson of texas. when you think of the political process, what do you believe the role of social media is as far as how folks like you communicate to the folks at home? >> guest: my job description is representative, and the most imporant part of that, of course, is to use my own good judgment based on my core principles and knowledge i have based on the feelings of my district to vote to represent them up here, but equally important is my role as communicator to make sure i keep them plugged in and insuring that they know what's being done here in washington. so i use social media, i see social media as a vital part of my job in communicating with my constituents, and quite frankly, i'm a very passionate jeffersonian republican who believes strongly in the tenth amendment and that we need to get the federal government away from my kids, my home, etc., let texas run texas, and i think social media will, frankly, be the root of the
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2009 8:00am EDT
>> this week on "the communicators," a discussion on how the internet is being used to provide transparency in the workings of government. our guest is ellen miller of the sunlight foundation. >> host: elleen miller is the executive directer of the sunlight foundation, and she's our guest on "the communicators" to talk about politics, money and technology. pead pedro is joining in the questioning this week. if you could start by telling us what the sunlight foundation and what it does. >> guest: sure. well, it's a 3-year-old nonprofit, nonpartisan institution that was designed to create greater transparency for the work of the u.s. government using new technology. so the internet and technologies that understand lie it are at the heart of every single thing that we do, and we're interested in transparency, particularly data and information about government and using the technology to put it into the hands of citizens where it really belongs. >> host: and how do you use that technology, and what kind of technology do you use? >> guest: well, there are several pieces to it. one,
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2009 8:00pm EDT
used to provide transparency in the workings of government. our guest is ellen miller of the sunlight foundation. >> ellen miller is directing of sunlight and is the guest this week on "the communicators" to talk about politics money and technology. producer of the communicators is joining in the questioning this week. ms. miller if you could start by telling about the sunlight foundation is and what it does. >> it is a 3-year-old nonprofit non-partisan institution that was designed to create greater transparency for the work of the u.s. government using the technology so the internet and of technologies underlying are at the heart of everything we do and we are interested in transparency particularly data and information about government and using the technology to put it in the head of citizens where it belongs. >> and how do you use the technology and what kind of technology to use? >> we use several pieces. one as the sort of core of our work is making sure that information produced and about the u.s. congress and exit of privilege and the regulatory agencies is available online i
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2009 6:30pm EDT
in the u.s.. >> this week on "the communicators, " david cohen joins us. thank you for being with us today. i want to start with the fact that there is pretty much a brand new fcc on the horizon. a couple of new members and chairman coming on line shortly. what are your feelings about the new fcc and the old fcc? >> it is easier to talk about the new fcc. i think all of the regulated industries under the jurisdiction of the fcc are full of high hopes for this commission. it is more than what we see in spring training every year where you have high hopes for the team, no matter where they may have finished the year before. i think this commission it is incredibly well qualified. you could say that julius is the most qualified and prepared person ever to be named chairman of the fcc, with his business background, his previous experience, his broad interests in telecommunications policy, we think he is going to be an outstanding chairman. surly from his early comments, focused on critical priority areas that we share, in particular the adoption of broadband in america to help make the united
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2009 8:00am EDT
," robert mcdowell, fcc commissioner just reconfirmed for his second five-year term. joining us, amy schatz of the weert journal. congratulations, thank you for being here. let's start broadly, first of all, this is kind of a two-parter. what in the next six months to a year would you like to see the fcc work on, and as one of only two republicans and one of five commissioners how much influence do you have in setting the agenda? >> guest: well, first of all, congress has mandated through the stimulus act that we present to congress a national broadband plan that's due february 17th. the date february 17th might seem familiar, that was the original date for the dtv transition earlier this year, so it seems to be an auspicious day for the fcc. so we're in the midst of soliciting public comment, data input and trying to get analysis to come up with some ideas to present to congress. so we kicked this off back in april with what we call a notice of inquiry where we sort of say to the world, please, give us your ideas and tell us what we should do. so we're in the midst of that process right no
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2009 6:30pm EDT
figured out how to use technology across the board. i was going to jump in here. i was once told that higher education is really where innovation in terms of innovation technology starts. if they really discover it has lots of potential in different markets, it may move on to the federal government. that may go to state and local government. then it may make it into k through 12. what is the role of using technology and taking research and using it to innovate new uses for technology? >> if you look across higher education, particularly in the case of george mason, you see things going on across the board. you see it in the school of information technology and engineering, the college of science, the school of public policy. you also see it in the geography department and many others. i could spend a long time listing all of the places. innovation in terms of developing and using technology is part of what we do. in the early days of computing, almost all of the innovation in terms of the new technologies came out of universities. over the years, it became where some can of the u
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2009 8:00am EDT
to participate in the questioning. gm used consistently described as one of the most wired universities and america. practically, what does that mean? >> guest: it has been involved in information technology. this begins by supporting the information technology community, also making sure we have plenty of technology on campus to support our students, faculty and staff. we take information technology very seriously. it probably doesn't hurt that i, as the president, and a computer scientist. we view these technologies for our students and faculty, like the council of old, you have got to have them, it is fascinating when they work, everyone takes them for granted. when something goes wrong everybody notices because everyone has become so dependent on information technology for research, learning, communicating, doing the business at the university. >> host: what kind of investment does george mason makes in hardware and computers? >> guest: at the senior level of the university we make sure there is a commitment to information technology. i have a chief confirmation officers who reports
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2009 8:00am EDT
think all of us in the cable industry -- i think all of the regulated industry are full of a lot of high hopes for this commission. it's more than what we see in spring training every year where you have high hopes for your team. i think this commission is incredibly well qualified. you could say that julius genachowski is the most qualified and prepared person ever to be named chairman of the fcc. with his business background, his previous fcc experience, his broad interest in telecommunications policy, and, you know, we think he's going to be an outstanding chairman of the fcc, and certainly from his early comments, you know, focused on really critical priority areas that we share, in particular the deployment and adoption of broadband in america to help to make the united states the most connected nation on earth. in rob mcdowell and michael copps we have two holdovers, if you will, from the past commission but both very knowledgen -- knowledgeable, both very fair. i think michael copps served as interim chair and showed what an outstanding public servant he is and what an outstanding
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2009 6:30pm EDT
say to the world, please give us your ideas. there are a lot of questions we would like to have answers to. we are in the midst of that process right now. in terms of being one of five, we all have an equal vote. the chairman sets the agenda for the commission. that is how it is set up by statute, but all the other commissioners have a role to consult with the chairman and it buys, and also to vote on matters that he puts before us -- and to advise. it is a small group, but one of the least partisan places in washington. this summer i had my summer law clerks do an analysis of my votes versus other commissioners, and it ends up that 70% of the time -- 9 out of 10 times, we are unanimous. the other 10% of the time, it is not partisan divide. bechtel would you like to see the broadband plan developed? >> i would like to see it as transparent as possible. what the commission is thinking as well as the date and opinions we are soliciting from the outside world. we should make that as transparent as possible. i am already on record as saying i would prefer if we could have put a plan
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2009 8:00pm EDT
to the world please give your ideas. there are a lot of questions we would like to have answers to and tell us what we should do. so we are in the midst of that process right now. in terms of being one of five, we all have an equal vote. the chairman sets the agenda for the commission. that's how it is set up by statute, but certainly all the other commissioners have a role to serve with the chairman and never see put before us. so it's a small group, but actually one of the least partisan places in washington. this summer i had my summer law clerk story and analysts of my votes versus other commissioners and ends up 89.72% of the time we have unanimous votes. some nine out of ten times we are unanimous and the other time isn't necessarily partisan divide. >> how would you like to see the broadband planned for? >> i want to be astronauts percent as possible. >> what does that mean? >> what the commission is thinking as well as the data and opinions we are soliciting from the outside world. we should make that as transparent as possible so there aren't any surprises. i'm already on record sayin
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2009 6:30pm EDT
come up with a perfect solution that is completely free. it is absolutely true that in order for us to provide help to those who have no insurance at all, that is going to cost some money pyrrhic is going to cost some money. we cannot do it for free. it is 46 million people. that is going to cost money. what i have proposed is going to cost roughly $900 billion. that is a lot of money. keep in mind, is over 10 years. when you hear some of these figures thrown out, it is over 10 years. let's assume it is about $80 billion a year. it turns out that about two- thirds of that could be paid for by eliminating waste in the existing system. let me give you one particular example. right now we provide 107 $7 billion over 10 years, about $18 billion a year to insurance companies in the forms of subsidies for something called medicare advantage, where they basically run the medicare program that everybody else has, except they did extra money that they make a big profit on. -- they get extra money. there is no evidence at all that seniors are better off using medicare advantage than regular m
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2009 8:00pm EDT
behind me, it seems i've got three times the bills i used to. and they're getting in the way of things i'd like to do. with the money bar, i can move my money around instantly, so when there's more bills than usual, it's no problem. and i use the wish list to put any extra money aside for anything i want. being in control of my money feels good. introducing the virtual wallet from pnc, a high-definition, online view of your money. pnc. leading the way.  >> bob: pitcher charlie morto leads off in the bottom of the 4th. through adam dunn. giants have an early run at houston tonight. battling a couple of clubs in the wild card race. giants in colorado. looking at morton extend. hit that ball. he hit it hard twice tonight. >> rob: single up the middle. top of the order. >> bob: we'll check in with our buddy and the trivia. losing pitcher in the 1960 world series. if memory serves me correctly... that was the racy stalllard? that is hard hit. mccutchen at the shortstop. , you know the wall. the old field. why ogi was trying to get that homer back still stands. >> rob: guzman trying to dou
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2009 8:00pm EDT
to have you with us here on this series, as the orioles take on the twins, and there's the look in right field for the metrodome. you can see it was built for football. >> one away here in the first inning. stating line-up force the birds.    >> good at bat by izturis. draws the one-o >>> scott maker has allowed 22 runs on the quire in his 22 start be, but check this out, only four left-handed batters have taken him deep. we've already seen, buck, he's trying to go inside and outside. >> buck: .224 average with only four home runs allowed on lefties. that just speaks to his ability to get the ball inside to left- handers. he is more dominant on that side of the plate, and hasn't had the same success bringing the pail in to the right-handed hitters. >> jim: high fly ball right field towards the corner. cuddyer comes over. luke scott is retired, as cuddyer finally hauls it in deep in the corner for the second out. it is .327 downty line there, ask eventually makes its way to 408 in straightaway center field, and because this field was really bui
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13